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April 2018

Shipping via Priority Mail to anywhere in the USA is a flat $10, for any quantity of glass.
International shipping cost will be higher and will be adjusted post sale.

If you have any questions, you may contact me via email Sorry, you need Javascript enabled to email me., or message me on Facebook or LE.
All of the photos below were taken in lighting equivalent to direct sunlight.
Colors will naturally look more subdued under less optimal lighting.


Two other bits of reasonably important information:

1) The colors on this page were mixed cullet/batch melts with a ”pinch of this” and a “dash of that”. As such, I can’t repeat them in the future.
So once all of this cane is gone, it is gone for good.

2) Because of other obligations this is quite possibly the only StrikingColor silver glass I will make in 2018. (Although I do have a few odds and ends that I expect to list eventually.)

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StrikingColor LY1103

Different views of the same two beads, both of which were made with LY1103 glass alone.


Different views of the same three beads, all of which were made with LY1103 alone.
All of the beads above were made with LY1103 alone. The different colors and patterns are due solely to how the glass was heated, cooled, and worked.


Description:

StrikingColor LY1103 contains silver, and can strike to a wide range of colors depending on how it is worked. It also seems to give pretty good color variations based on how the glass was laid down. If you lay down hot glass next to cold it will typically hold the color variations between the two pretty well, even after the entire bead has been strongly reheated. If overstruck, the striking sequence can be restarted by getting the glass very hot, cooling, and starting over. The color will not burn out with repeated heating and resetting of the color.

This glass does have a slight quirk that might make it a little difficult for silver glass rookies. I found that it seems to work best when striking is started at a higher temperature than usual. In other words, I had better luck when I didn't allow it to get too cold before warming it again for the initial strike. Starting the reheat just as wisps of amber began appearing as it cooled seemed to work best for me. When cooled too much prior to the reheat it tends to get "stuck" on shades of dark brown. Also, the longer/slower it is warmed in for striking, the more likely those browns will appear. Which means it can take a little experimentation and practice to get the best heat/cool striking sequence figured out.

So it may not be an ideal glass for those with limited silver glass experience. With that said, "resetting" the color by getting the glass very hot again isn't a problem. As mentioned above, he color will not burn out even after repeated reheatings. These were my personal observations while I was working the glass, but obviously, what works best for you is the way you should do it, no matter what works for me.

Compatibility of LY1103 with Moretti/Effetre 104 COE clear cane looks dead on. Regardless, testing with any particular glass you plan to mix with it is advised before going into production. Obviously, compatibility will not be an issue when using this glass by itself.

The color of LY1103 cane is a medium/dark transparent amber. The canes are approximately 11 inches long and 4-8mm in diameter.

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StrikingColor TY119

Two views of the same test beads made with solid TY119.


Two views of round beads made with TY119. The bead on the left in each photo is solid TY119,
and the bead on the right is a gravity swirl using TY119 and clear glass.




Description:

StrikingColor TY119 is one of my personal favorites. While making the sample beads in the photos above, it struck fast and easily for me to a variety of colors, both light and dark. It also tends to give good color variations based on how the glass was laid down - if you lay down hot glass next to cold it will usually hold the color variations between the two. And varying the colors with spot heating worked very well. If overstruck, the striking sequence can be restarted by getting the glass very hot, cooling, and starting over. As with all silver glasses, what works best for you is the way you should do it, regardless of what works for me.

The color of TY119 cane varies somewhat, the majority being a transparent light amber with a slight greenish tint. Thicker canes tend to be a darker amber. The canes are approximately 11 inches long and roughly 4 - 8mm in diameter. This glass contains silver, and as can be seen from the photos of the sample beads above, can strike to a wide range of colors depending on how it is worked. The color will not burn out with repeated heating and resetting of the color. TY119 compatibility with Moretti/Effetre 104 COE clear cane looks good.

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General information:


Because silver glasses can require intermediate to advanced techniques to successfully develop the color(s), this glass is not recommended for those without a reasonable amount of glassworking experience. (However, TY119 seems to strike easily enough to be pretty user friendly for silver glass rookies.)

Best used with a neutral to oxidizing flame, experimentation is the ideal way to determine what works best with your torch and fuel combination. The beads in the listing photos were all made with GCM522 alone. The color variations in those beads are solely due to the striking characteristics of the glass. All of these beads were worked on a Nortel Minor torch using propane and bottled oxygen. Feedback from customers has shown that StrikingColor glass also works well for those using a well maintained oxygen concentrator. It is not recommended for anyone using a HotHead or other single fuel torch.

Annealing StrikingColor glass around 910 or 920F is recommended to minimize any color change in the annealer, although this is just a rough guideline as the heating characteristics of different annealers can vary considerably. Annealing at higher temperatures will increase the possibility of color changes. As a general rule, if your color is shifting drastically during annealing, turn down your oven. If you garage your beads prior to annealing rather than batch anneal, a garaging temperature of no higher than 880 - 900F is recommended. Long soaks at high temperatures will almost guarantee unwanted color changes. On the other hand, the adventurous might want to experiment with slightly higher temperatures to see how they might affect the color.

Please keep in mind that silver glasses in general have a well deserved reputation for being unpredictable. The descriptions above are my impressions of the working characteristics of each of the various glasses after making test beads with them on a Nortel Minor torch using bottled oxygen and propane and a neutral to oxidizing flame. Those people using other setups may have different results, as will those who work the glass differently. For that reason it is impossible to predict what a particular glass might do in your hands. (I sometimes can't even get the same results out of the same rod of glass on two beads made one after the other.) So some experimentation on your part is likely to be required for the best results.


With that said, here are some general guidelines:

The variations in color shown in the sample bead photos are primarily due to variations in the heating and cooling of different parts of the beads. Because it is easier to vary the heating on a larger or longer bead these glasses will usually give better color variation on those type of beads, rather than on a standard, small round bead. Since a small round bead tends to stay a relatively uniform temperature throughout while being worked, there will be less variation in the color. One can intentionally spot-heat parts of a bead to help overcome this, but it can still be difficult to get enough temperature variation to get a wide variety of colors in a small bead. For this reason, silver glasses will usually produce better results on larger/longer beads.

Some nice color variations can also be produced on beads made with a metal bead press, particularly flattened or diamond shaped beads. One suggestion I would have for those making flattened types of beads is to give a quick shot of a hot, sharp flame to the middle of the bead after pressing. Then let it cool a bit and very gently heat the entire bead. I have seen some very nice color patterns produced like this. But as always, experimentation is the best way to determine what works well with your particular setup.

It is usually best to work at either end of the heat spectrum - either very hot (for shaping and/or resetting color), or fairly cool (for striking and/or uniformly heating a bead before putting it away). Working a bead at medium/high heat for long periods will almost invariably cause the color to overstrike. Although there will be exceptions to this when using specific glasses, it generally holds true.